Home Featured Investigation The Shackles That Remain

The Shackles That Remain

Hypnosis helped send Fred Clay to prison almost 40 years ago when police used the now-discredited technique to sharpen the fuzzy memory of a witness in Clay’s trial for the murder of a taxi driver. That conviction was thrown out by a superior court judge in Boston, freeing Clay after 38 years behind bars.

Even though Massachusetts law calls for immediate services and monetary compensation for wrongly convicted men and women, Clay’s newly-won freedom quickly turned into a struggle for basic survival without any support from the state that wrongfully convicted him.

Interview: Freed after 38 years

Listen to Jason Flom's interview with NECIR Reporter Chris Burrell for the podcast, Wrongful Conviction, discussing the case of Fred Clay and his 38...

After $1 mil payout for wrongful conviction, Fred Clay back at...

A day after learning that he’ll receive a $1 million settlement from the state, Fred Clay treated it like just another work day — punching the...

Fred Clay, wrongfully convicted and jailed 38 years, gets $1 million...

Fred Clay, who was wrongfully convicted of murder and spent almost 38 years in Massachusetts’ prisons, will receive a $1 million settlement from the...

Fighting for compensation after a wrongful conviction and 38 years in...

This story aired on NPR's Morning Edition on December 19, 2018. It is based on NECIR's four-part series that originally was broadcast by WGBH...

After 38 years in prison, old shackles are gone but new...

This is Part 2 of a two-part series. Read Part 1 here. For nearly 38 years, every time Fred Clay left prison for a court hearing,...

Interview: Chris Burrell and the Fred Clay case

From The Takeaway, a public radio production from PRI and WNYC: In August last year, Frederick Clay was released after serving 38 years in prison...

Wrongfully jailed for 38 years, Fred Clay rebuilds his life in...

Hypnosis helped send Fred Clay to prison almost 40 years ago when police used the now-discredited technique to sharpen the fuzzy memory of a...

Send this to a friend